PORK

Pork is the most widely eaten meat in the world, providing about 38 percent of daily meat protein intake worldwide, although consumption varies widely from place to place. This is despite religious restrictions on the consumption of pork and the prominence of red meat (beef and lamb) industries in the West. Pork consumption has been rising for thirty years, both in actual terms and in terms of meat-market share.

Pork may be cooked from fresh meat or cured over time. Cured meat products include ham and bacon. The carcass may be utilised in many different ways for fresh meat cuts, with the popularity of certain cuts and certain carcass proportions varying worldwide.

Fresh meat
Most of the carcass can be used to produce fresh meat and in the case of a suckling pig the whole body of a young pig ranging in age from two to six weeks is roasted.

Cuts of Pork

Head
This can be used to make brawn, stocks and soups. After boiling the ears can be fried or baked and eaten separately.

Spare Rib Roast/Spare Rib Joint /Blade shoulder
This is the shoulder and contains the shoulder blade. It can be boned out and rolled up as a roasting joint, or cured as "collar bacon". Not to be confused with the rack of spare ribs from the front belly.

Hand
This can be cured on the bone to make a ham, or used in sausages.

Loin
This can be cured to give back bacon. The loin and belly can be cured together to give a side of bacon. The loin can also be divided up into roasting joints and pork chops.

Belly
The belly, although a fattier meat, can be used for steaks or diced stir-fry meat. Belly pork may be rolled for roasting or cut for streaky bacon.

Legs/Hams
Although any cut of pork can be cured, technically speaking only the back leg is entitled to be called a ham. Legs and shoulders, when used fresh, are usually cut bone-in for roasting, or leg steaks can be cut from the bone.

Trotters
Both the front and hind trotters can be cooked and eaten, as can the tail

Pork ribs
Taken from the pig's ribs and the meat surrounding the bones.